Saturday, 16 April 2016

Adding natural elements to playgrounds can help depression in kids: study | CTV News

Adding natural elements to playgrounds can help depression in kids: study | CTV News

The full article can be read through the hyperlink above

'Populating a playground with natural elements that feature sand, grass and water can help reduce signs of depression in children, according to research by the University of British Columbia.'

Swings, slides and iPads: the gaming companies targeting kids' outdoor play | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

Swings, slides and iPads: the gaming companies targeting kids' outdoor play | Guardian Sustainable Business | The Guardian

The full article can be read through the hyperlink above

Yeah, I'm one of those people who thinks that playspaces should be technology free. How do you develop your own imaginative in play if you (a child ) are restricted by a computer programs narrative?
And have a look at the associated video's they leave me spout-raged ,speechless and outraged at the same time. 


Three-quarters of UK children now spend less time outside than prison inmates, according to a new survey, with the lure of digital technology partly to blame. But, in a world where gaming and screen time are an everyday reality, could the right technology actually get more kids to play outdoors?

Hybrid Play is a Spanish start-up which uses augmented reality (AR) – patching computer imagery on to real life – to transform playgrounds into video games. A wireless sensor resembling an over-sized clothes peg clips onto any piece of playground equipment. It then registers the movement of the children as they play and converts it into video games to play through a smartphone. Demonstration of Hybrid Play

Co-founder Clara Boj says she is aware that many people think playgrounds should be technology free: “But our hybrid games are designed to put physical playing at the centre of the experience, not technology.”




Madison kick off plans to Connect Children to Nature | Madison Commons

Madison kick off plans to Connect Children to Nature | Madison Commons

The full article can be read through the hyperlink above

“Each [child] can develop a sense of belonging in the natural world and ability to recognize one’s power in the community and identify as a steward of the environment,” Svingen said. “Access to nature and green spaces has the ability to heal wounds of stress.”

Saturday, 2 April 2016

Working with nature to create better buildings | News | Eco-Business | Asia Pacific

Working with nature to create better buildings | News | Eco-Business | Asia Pacific

The full article and more pictures can be obtained from the hyperlink above


"It is really about taking a design approach that strengthens the connection with nature and these ideas can start from the ground up."

Sunday, 20 March 2016

Here's What the Rooftop Healing Garden at Children's National Will Look Like | Washingtonian

Here's What the Rooftop Healing Garden at Children's National Will Look Like | Washingtonian

The full article and more pictures can be obtained from the hyperlink above


The last wish of a patient at Children’s National was to go outside–but the complex life support treatments that the child’s condition required made it a complicated dream for her doctors, nurses, and the biomedical staff to fulfill.

“That child really inspired us to say that every single child, who is complex or not, should deserve the privilege of being outside,” says Kathleen Gorman, COO at Children’s National.

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Thus, the idea for a 7,200-square-foot rooftop garden, equipped with electrical outlets to power treatments and therapies, was born. Though the rooftop garden was first suggested about four years ago, it wasn’t until just recently that adequate funds were raised, allowing construction to begin.


Richmond Made A Playground Risky. Now Another Community Is Following Suit.

Richmond Made A Playground Risky. Now Another Community Is Following Suit.

The full article and more pictures and a video can be obtained from the hyperlink above
'The goal is "to raise a generation of kids that feel comfortable with trying new things and being creative and feel comfortable failing," UBC professor Mariana Brussoni told CTV.

Learning how to handle risks teaches kids how to "protect themselves in challenging environments," according to University of Texas professor Joe Frost. "The view that children must somehow be sheltered from all risks of injury is a common misconception of adults."

"The view that children must somehow be sheltered from all risks of injury is a common misconception of adults," he wrote in a 2006 paper. Frost said that limiting kids' outdoor play can harm them later in life during an interview with the Journal of Play two years later. "It limits their physical fitness, hurts their health, and reduces learning and the ability to cope with trauma," the professor said. "Research shows that when children engage in free, spontaneous play outdoors, they adapt more readily to their culture, to society, and to the world. They build fine and gross motor skills. They learn to negotiate and solve problems. They stretch their imagination."

Syrian Children Delight In A Subterranean Damascus Playground, Safe From Civil War Shelling

Syrian Children Delight In A Subterranean Damascus Playground, Safe From Civil War Shelling

The full article and more pictures can be obtained from the hyperlink above

I'd written a blog post recently about how sometimes environmental concerns can force childrens playspaces to be built undercover. At the time I hadn't considered bombing or biological warfare to be one of those concerns. More power to the people and organisation who constructed this beautiful playspace.




'Children in Damascus are able to play safely from the shelling in the streets above thanks to an underground playground constructed by activists. The subterranean park, which was built in Ghouta in the eastern part of the capital city, allows the city's youth to have a glimpse of a normal childhood away from the bloodshed of the civil war... at least for a while.'


























I'd written a blog post recently about how sometimes environmental concerns can force childrens to be built undercover. At the time I hadn't considered bombing or biological warfare to be one of those concerns. More power to the people and organisation who constructed this beautiful playspace.