Sunday, 2 April 2017

Access to nature reduces depression and obesity, finds European study | Society | The Guardian

Access to nature reduces depression and obesity, finds European study | Society | The Guardian


“The evidence is strong and growing that people and communities can only thrive when they have access to nature,” said Robbie Blake, a nature campaigner for Friends of the Earth Europe, which commissioned the analysis......“We all need nature in our lives, it gives us freedom and helps us live healthily; yet deprived communities are routinely cut off from nature in their surroundings and it is suffocating for their well-being.”

In Chicago and Philadelphia, the Difference a Park Makes - The New York Times

In Chicago and Philadelphia, the Difference a Park Makes - The New York Times

“Urban policy often focuses too much just on housing,” Mr. Emanuel told me, grateful to focus on what has become a central plank of his administration and not talk policing or murder rates. “Housing alone doesn’t make a neighborhood.”

City of Denver focusing on making natural playgrounds



City of Denver focusing on making natural playgrounds

“The most important part of this is we just want kids to connect to nature in a way that I remember when I was a kid, but we know is missing from most of their lives now,” Bienenstock said. “It turns out that playgrounds, where their parents will take them, are one of the few places where they can have this experience.”
...... Emily Patterson, parks for people program manager for the Trust for Public Land, believes the appeal in natural playgrounds is connecting youth to the outdoors in ways that let their imagination take over and open doors to exploring more of the terrain. She noted numerous barriers that prevent some youth from experiencing the outdoors.

Sunday, 8 January 2017

Brain + Nature = Healthy - Bay Nature

Brain + Nature = Healthy - Bay Nature

The full article can be read through the hyperlink above

NATURE IS RESTORATIVE; that’s practically a truism to anyone who loves the outdoors. The effects start within minutes and can be long-lasting, even transformative, when nature works on us over the course of days or weeks. Scientific research now confirms what we already know: We become more relaxed, more open and friendly, and more creative, with better memory and concentration, after being in nature. Nature lowers blood pressure, reduces stress, and bolsters our immune system. In fact, the benefits from contact with nature are now so well documented that they’re showing up on the health care industry’s agenda, and protecting nature can be seen as a public health strategy.