Friday, 23 December 2011

Green Invasion / Genaro Alva, Claudia Ampuero, Denise Ampuero, Gloria Rojas | Platform Architecture

Green Invasion / Genaro Alva, Claudia Ampuero, Denise Ampuero, Gloria Rojas | Platform Architecture

An exceptional project from the city of Lima. The projects attempts to create free green space in an area whose local government has purposely bowed to developers by ignoring the requirement for urban greening in favour of building density.


To quote the article which has been translated from Spanish, "The rapid growth of the city of Lima has meant that it begins to densify considerably to meet existing demands. Consequently there is a real estate boom which seeks to provide as much as possible m2 aside public recreation spaces. Furthermore, the lack of urban policy by municipalities has led to the recreational spaces for the city such as parks, plazas, boulevards, etc., are considered unimportant in the concept of quality of life or become private clubs with a minimum payment you can access your benefits."

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Metropolitan Development Plan (PLANDEMET), among others, for each inhabitant of a city, it should offer recreation area 8m2. In our case the city of Lima offers its citizens only 1.98 m2 per inhabitant, ie there is a deficit of about 4800 hectares of recreational areas.

It is against this context that the proposal INVASION GREEN, which seeks demonstrate the lack of recreation areas, the lack of an urban tree planting plan and landscaping to Lima. All this through the occupation of an area in the city wear, which will be recovered as a result will reactivate the public sense of the city. In addition, this appropriation will be reactive, as users involved in the expansion of this invasion that reproduces and grows for the benefit of the city.

The proposal aims to turn the passage Incarnation, used as a pedestrian street parking despite being banned in a large green carpet made ​​of natural grass which will feature furniture made ​​from recycled rubber and plastic (seats , tables, playgrounds, sculptures, etc..) so the green invasion not only has a literal meaning but an ecological sense.


Can you imagine living somewhere you have to pay to go to the park? 



Post a Comment